Cartelisation of Art

The phenomena of cartelisation of art comes from the assurance that there are art actors who need to be protected or patronized what legitimates not only the immanence of power within the community but also the authority of this community outside.

Author: Suhail Malik
Link: iksv.org
Year: 2013
Country: UK
Edited image of the police investigators working at a crime scene where seven bodies were found gunned down in the border city of Ciudad Juarez, northern Mexico, November 25, 2008. REUTERS/Alejandro Bringas

 

Malik defines an artworld as a cartel in comparison with the Mexican ones. Malik isn’t translated into Russian being one of the most critical theoreticians rethinking the very structure of an art world. He defines the transactions within an artworld as unclear, untransparent and based on the personal preferences without any objective, regulated and mutually shared criteria. The phenomena of cartelisation of art ruins the very possibilities for an art market to be developed especially in periphery and small areas but also in metropolises where the second market such as gifts from artists or reselling of artworks crucify the possibility of competitive commercial scene. Cartel makes its rules and inner regulations of its processes being visible to its participants only and dump economic processes within the art market through the support of the same art actors of the art scene. It comes from the assurance that there are art actors who need to be protected or patronized which is already powerful position. It’s the cartel of the art system which establishes relations within the art system and Malik draws it very precisely on economical and political levels of impact.

More about – in the catalogue for Istanbul Biennale 2013 (p. 631).